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Home From the State of Tennessee
From the State of Tennessee

 

State of Tennessee

Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Tennessee Early Voting Going Strong

Nearly 1 out of 8 Registered Voters Have Already Cast Ballots

For Immediate Release from the Tennessee Secretary of State: October 23, 2012

Tennessee early voting continues to be strong through the first five days of early voting. A total of 103,642 voters cast their ballots Monday, bringing the overall total to 491,575 leading into the sixth day of early voting Tuesday. Tennessee has approximately 4 million registered voters.

“Voter turnout continues to exceed expectations,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “Voters continue to avoid long Election Day lines by voting early.”

Early voting will continue through Thursday, November 1. Voters with questions regarding the locations and hours of early voting are encouraged to contact their local election commission offices.

Go to Press Release at http://tnsos.org/Press/story.php?item=434


Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Early Voting Turnout Continues To Surge

For Immediate Release from the Tennessee Secretary of State: October 19, 2012

Tennessee voters again showed up in huge numbers yesterday as early voting continued for the November 6 election. With all 95 counties reporting, more than 100,000 voters statewide cast ballots for the second day in a row, bringing the overall total to 228,245 voters over the first two days of the early voting period.

“Tennessee voters clearly want their voices to be heard in this election,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett. “I am grateful to the county election officials who have worked hard to prepare for this large turnout.”

Early voting continues daily (except Sundays) through Thursday, November 1. Voters with questions regarding the locations and hours of early voting

Go to Press Release at http://tnsos.org/Press/story.php?item=431


Secretary of State Tre Hargett

Tennessee Voters Take Advantage of Early Voting

For Immediate Release from the Tennessee Secretary of State: October 18, 2012

Tennessee voters turned in a strong showing at the polls yesterday, the first day of early voting for the November 6 election.   With all 95 counties reporting, a statewide total of 121,406 voters cast their ballots yesterday.

“I am pleased with the huge turnout we have seen to begin the early voting period,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett.  “It is my hope that as many Tennesseans as possible take advantage of the flexibility that early voting allows.”

Early voting will continue through Thursday, November 1.  Voters with questions regarding the locations and hours of early voting are encouraged to contact their local election commission offices.

Go to Press Release at http://tnsos.org/Press/story.php?item=430

 

Justin P. Wilson, State Comptroller

For Immediate Release: Sept. 5, 2012

Comptroller’s Office Releases Semiannual Debt Report

The Comptroller’s office has released the semiannual State of Tennessee Indebtedness Report, which can be viewed online at http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/sl/

The report provides an overview of the state’s debt for the period from Dec. 31, 2011 until June 30, 2012 and other debt-related activities for fiscal year 2012.

During the period, the state’s overall indebtedness decreased by about $257 million. Also, refinancing of some debt created a present value savings of $61 million. And the state maintained high bond ratings from the country’s three major rating agencies.

“This report contains good news for the taxpayers of Tennessee,” Comptroller Justin P. Wilson said. “Our state has low debt, high credit ratings and well-managed finances. With the strong fiscal leadership provided by the General Assembly, we certainly expect those positive trend lines to continue.”

 

 

Secretary of State Tre Hargett

For Immediate Release: July 25, 2012

Secretary Hargett’s Statement Regarding Photo ID Lawsuit

On Tuesday, a lawsuit was filed challenging the application of the state’s photo identification law for voters.

Today, a judge denied a temporary restraining order in that lawsuit. The net effect of the judge’s decision is that the City of Memphis library cards will not be accepted at the polls as valid state photo ID for voting purposes.  The plaintiffs argued a library card with a photo issued by the City of Memphis library was a state photo ID.

“The legislature clearly intended that only state or federal photo IDs can be used, which prevents us from accepting county or city IDs,” said Secretary of State Tre Hargett.  “Our Division of Elections remains ready to assist any voter with questions about how they may obtain a free photo ID for voting from the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security.”

A voter who does not present a state- or federally-issued photo ID at the polls will not be turned away, but will receive a provisional ballot.  However, the voter will need to return to the local election commission office within two business days after the election and present a state- or federally-issued photo ID in order for the provisional ballot to be counted.

Examples of acceptable forms of ID, whether current or expired, include driver licenses, U.S. passports, Department of Safety photo ID cards, U.S. military photo IDs and other state or federal government photo ID cards. College student IDs are not acceptable.  Nowhere in the photo ID law is a city or county ID listed as an example of an acceptable ID.

For more information, please visit www.GoVoteTN.com or call the Division of Elections toll-free at 1-877-850-4959.

Media contact: Blake Fontenay, Communications Director, (615) 253-2668 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 

Justin P. Wilson, State Comptroller

For Immediate Release: June 21, 2012

More than $700,000 Stolen from Tennessee Counties Unrecovered

As of June 30, 2011, county government officials across Tennessee had not recovered nearly three quarters of a million dollars stolen from their coffers.

Details about the missing money are available in the Comptroller’s annual cash shortage report, which was released this week.

Information about the cash shortages was compiled from the annual financial reports and special reports for the 89 Tennessee counties that are regularly audited by the Comptroller’s Division of Local Government Audit and the six counties audited by private accounting firms.

More than $213,000 in missing county funds was identified during the fiscal year that ended June 30, 2012.

The report details how much money was stolen from each county, as well as a description of when the thefts were discovered, how the thefts occurred, how much money has been successfully recovered and legal action taken against those responsible for the thefts.

“These thefts are a reminder that local government officials need to be vigilant about the potential that taxpayer dollars can be stolen,” Comptroller Justin P. Wilson said. “The best safeguard against theft of public funds is the use of proper accounting and bookkeeping techniques. Quite often, county government officials believe there’s no way theft would occur within their organizations – then they are shocked when it does. As the old expression goes, ‘trust, but verify.’”

The cash shortage report can be viewed online at: http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/repository/CA/2011/Cash%20Shortage%20Report%202011.pdf

 

Justin P. Wilson, State Comptroller

For Immediate Release: May 17, 2012

Complete College Act Implementation Going Well, but Improvements Still Needed

Implementation of the Complete College Act of 2010 is going well, although there are steps that should be taken to improve the process, according to a report released today by the Comptroller’s Division of State Audit. Auditors examined the efforts of the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees and the Tennessee Board of Regents in implementing the law. Under the law, public community colleges and universities are supposed to create “transfer pathways” – that is, blocks of class credits that are guaranteed to transfer from one higher education institution to another. However, through the end of last year, transfer pathways had been created to accommodate only 23 majors. The report recommends that transfer pathways be created for all available college majors, or else the Tennessee General Assembly may want to consider exempting some particularly challenging majors from the provisions of the law. The report also suggests that colleges and universities should place more emphasis on publicizing the available transfer pathways on their web sites. The new law also requires funding for colleges and universities to be based on a formula that includes factors such as the number of students who graduate, as opposed to the number of students who enroll. The report suggests that the Tennessee Higher Education Commission needs to provide more detail about what types of data higher education institutions need to submit in order to take advantage of the funding formula. Also, the report says those institutions should take additional steps to verify that the data they provide is accurate. The law calls for the elimination of unnecessary redundancies in academic program offerings. The report recommends that the Tennessee Higher Education Commission be vigilant in ensuring redundancies are eliminated. If unneeded programs are not eliminated, the report says the General Assembly may wish to transfer authority for eliminating those programs from the Tennessee Board of Regents and the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees to the Tennessee Higher Education Commission. “I am pleased that progress has been made, but this report clearly illustrates that there is more work to be done,” Comptroller Justin P. Wilson said. “I hope the Tennessee Higher Education Commission, Tennessee Board of Regents and University of Tennessee Board of Trustees will continue their efforts to implement these recommendations in order to make sure the law is put into practice in the manner in which our state legislators intended it to be.” To view the report online, go to http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/repository/SA/pa11055.pdf

Justin P. Wilson, State Comptroller

For Immediate Release: April 9, 2012

Comptroller Wilson Releases Quarterly Fiscal Affairs Report

Governments in Tennessee are doing a better job of reporting financial information in a timely manner, according to a report scheduled for release today.

Under best practices, the state’s Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the fiscal year ending on June 30 should be released before December 31.  Two years ago, it was issued on August 6, more than 13 months after the end of the fiscal year.  Last year, it was released on March 29 – nearly three months late. In 2011, however, it was issued on schedule on December 29.

Last year was the first time in memory, certainly in the 21st Century, that the financial statements of all 95 counties were filed by a March 31 deadline.  This year, all 95 were completed again on a timely basis.

“To make good decisions, you need good information.  Information is not good if it is not current,” Comptroller Justin P. Wilson said. “Making that information available to the public is an important step to bring transparency to government operations. I applaud finance officials at the state and county levels for preparing the financial reports and getting our auditors the information they needed to complete those audits.”

The quarterly fiscal report can be found at: http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/repository/NR/20120409JPWQuarterlyFiscalAffairsReport.pdf

Comptroller Wilson is scheduled to present the report during a meeting of the House Finance, Ways and Means Committee today. To view the PowerPoint presentation he plans to share with the committee, go to: http://www.comptroller.tn.gov/repository/NR/20120409JPWQuarterlyFiscalAffairsPPT.pdf

Media contact: Blake Fontenay, Communications Director, (615) 253-2668 or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it